ACADEMY AWARDS DVDS

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MORE CURRENT ACADEMY AWARD SHOWS ARE AVAIL

 

MANY MORE VARIOUS AWARD SHOWS ARE AVAIL --SEE SECTION ON WEBSITE FOR OTHERS LIKE SOUL TRAIN AWARDS, BET AWARDS, EMMY AWARDS, COUNTRY MUSIC AWARDS, TONY AWARDS ETC ETC 

 

 

ACADEMY AWARDS

ACADEMY AWARDS 2 DVD 2010 360 minutes, crystal, includes 120 minutes of the E channel red carpet

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 2009 160 minutes, crystal clear

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 69th ANNUAL 1997... The 69th Academy Awards were dominated by movies produced by independent studios, financed outside of mainstream Hollywood, leading to 1996 being dubbed "The Year of the Independents". All but one of the nominees for Best Picture were low-budget independent movies (the next ceremony dominated by indie fims would be in 2006. 2008 was also dominated by independents). The big winner at the ceremony was Anthony Minghella's The English Patient, which had received 12 nominations and won 9 awards including Best Picture. Other notable movies to be honoured at the ceremony included Fargo, which had been nominated for 7 awards and won 2, Shine, which had been nominated for 7 awards and won just one, and Jerry Maguire, which had been nominated for 5 awards and also won just one.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 68th ANNUAL 3/25/96… The 68th Academy Awards were held on March 25, 1996, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. The show was hosted by Whoopi Goldberg. The ceremony was watched by 44.48 million viewers, with 30.5% of households tuning in. Despite controversy from the NAACP concerning what was deemed as a lack of attention to African-American actors by the Academy, this show was the one and only time an African-American (Quincy Jones) was hired to produce the show to date. Key moments in this presentation included Christopher Reeve making his first public appearance onstage after becoming paralyzed, and a Lifetime Achievement Award to Kirk Douglas (recovering from a stroke), and a tribute to Gene Kelly from Savion Glover (Kelly had died one month prior to the ceremonies). Best Documentary Feature winner Jon Blair introduced Miep Gies, the last survivor of the group of people who had sheltered Anne Frank and her family and 4 other people in their secret Amsterdam hiding place during World War II, and the person who had saved Anne Frank's now famous diary for posterity. The entire audience in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion gave Gies a lengthy standing ovation. Braveheart won five Oscars out of ten nominations including Best Picture. It is however, one of the few Best Picture winners that did not receive any acting nominations, a feat that would not be repeated until 2004, when The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King was nominated for (and won) eleven Oscars, none of which were in an acting category. This year's ceremony was the last time the Special Achievement Academy Award was awarded, to the first CGI animated feature Toy Story from Pixar, for making the first CGI animated film. Also, Mira Sorvino's win for Best Supporting Actress for Mighty Aphrodite making her the second winner of Best Supporting Actress from a Woody Allen's film in a row, after last year Dianne Wiest also won Best Supporting Actress for Bullets Over Broadway, a Woody Allen film. The Best Documentary Feature and Best Documentary Short winners were both about the Holocaust. As of 2012 this is the last Oscars where all 4 acting winners were not in a Best Picture nominated film. Last time that happened was during the 42nd Academy Awards.

 


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 67th ANNUAL 3/27/95… The 67th Academy Awards, honoring the best films of 1994, were held on March 27, 1995 at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California. They were hosted by comedian and talk show host David Letterman. The ceremony is perhaps best remembered for Letterman's performance as the host. Although some thought of him as different but good, most critics labeled his performance as terrible and vowed for him never to host the Oscars again. This negative criticism arose from Letterman's absurdist brand of comedy, and it would lead to Late Show with David Letterman losing in the ratings to The Tonight Show with Jay Leno by the summer of 1995. Letterman seems to have a sense of humor about it, however, because around Academy Award season he frequently references his lackluster appearance at the Academy awards on his show in a humorous tone. Forrest Gump won Best Picture, as well as an additional five Oscars, including Tom Hanks' second consecutive Academy Award for Best Actor. Hanks became only the second person in Oscar history to accomplish the feat of winning consecutive awards in the Best Actor category, the first being Spencer Tracy. Also, Jessica Lange, winner of the 1982 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for Tootsie, won the Academy Award for Best Actress for Tony Richardson's last film, Blue Sky, joining an elite group of thespians who have won Oscars in both the supporting and lead categories. Dianne Wiest won her second Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Woody Allen film, becoming the first person to win two Oscars in the same category where the films were directed by the same person (she won another Best Supporting Actress in 1986 for Hannah and Her Sisters). This year had the rarity of producing a tie. When Tim Allen opened the envelope for Best Live Action Short, much to his surprise there was a tie. This is the last time (as of 2012) this has happened. The awards this year were also notable for the near inclusion of a documentary as Best Picture. The documentary category was then, as always, nominated by a special committee. The critically acclaimed film Hoop Dreams failed to make the documentary committee's short list, even though it was on more critics' top ten lists than any other film that year, including Pulp Fiction, Forrest Gump, The Shawshank Redemption, and Quiz Show. Many prominent critics, most notably Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert campaigned for Academy members to vote to nominate Hoop Dreams for Best Picture, something that had never happened before. The effort failed, yet Hoop Dreams was nominated for Best Film Editing, one of the few documentaries ever to be nominated in a craft category. This was only the second, and most recent, time in Oscar history where 3 of the 4 acting winners were repeats; the other time was during the 1938 Oscars. Interestingly enough, the only first timer was Martin Landau who was the oldest of the bunch.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 66th ANNUAL 3/21/94… The 66th Academy Awards were presented March 21, 1994, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The show was a landmark in that it featured a female African-American host for the first time, Whoopi Goldberg, and represented a direct contrast in edgy style from Billy Crystal who had hosted the show the previous four years. Schindler's List dominated the evening winning seven Oscars out of its 12 nominations, including Best Picture. Another big winner was The Piano, which received eight nominations and won three awards. Anna Paquin's win, at age 11, made her the second youngest competitive winner in Oscar history, the youngest being Tatum O'Neal, who won the award at age 10. Jane Campion became only the second woman in history to be nominated for Best Director. Although she did not win, she received the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. Kathryn Bigelow later became the first female to win the Best Director prize in 2010. Schindler's List became the first black and white film to win Best Picture in 33 years, the last one being The Apartment; and the last one to win before The Artist in 2012.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 65th ANNUAL 3/29/93 w/original commercials… The 65th Academy Awards were presented March 29, 1993 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. This was the fourth consecutive show hosted by Billy Crystal. Unforgiven won four Oscars out of nine nominations including Best Picture.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 64th ANNUAL 3/3/92… The 64th Academy Awards were presented March 30, 1992 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The show was the third consecutive to be hosted by Billy Crystal. When Jack Palance won Best Supporting Actor for his performance as Curly in City Slickers (which also starred Crystal), Palance's acceptance speech began with the joke "I crap bigger than him (Crystal)" -- a reference to a similar line in the film. Palance also used some of his speech time to prove his virility by performing one-handed push-ups. In mock retaliation for Palance's comment, Crystal peppered the remainder of the telecast with jokes about Palance performing spectacular feats. As a result, Crystal won an Emmy for hosting the show, although he later (in the documentary Get Bruce) credited Bruce Vilanch for providing him many of the Palance jokes. The Silence of the Lambs won the five major awards out of seven nominations, becoming only the third film to accomplish the feat of winning the "Top Five", after It Happened One Night (1934) and One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest (1975). This year's ceremony made Academy Award History as Beauty and the Beast was nominated for Best Picture, the first time an Animated Feature Film was bestowed with such an honor. The Picture garnered a total of six nominations in four different categories, eventually collecting two awards for its Music (Best Original Score and Original Song, for "Beauty and the Beast"). An animated feature wouldn't be nominated for Best Picture again until 2009. It also became one of the few films to be nominated for Best Picture despite no nominations in any directing, acting, or writing categories. The Silence of the Lambs was the last Best Picture winner to take home only major Oscars (no tech or music awards) until A Beautiful Mind. The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award was presented to George Lucas by the crew of the space shuttle Atlantis during the STS-45 mission, which also included an actual Oscar statuette aboard the spacecraft.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 63rd ANNUAL 3/25/91 w/original commercials… The 63rd Academy Awards were presented March 25, 1991 at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. The show was hosted by Billy Crystal. The prominent winner was Dances with Wolves which earned seven Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Director. Kathy Bates and Jeremy Irons won Best Actress and Actor, Joe Pesci won Best Supporting Actor, and Whoopi Goldberg was named Best Supporting Actress, making history by becoming the first African-American actress since Hattie McDaniel in 1939 to win an Academy Award. Seven members of Reba McEntire's band and her road manager were among 10 who died in a March 16, 1991 plane crash near San Diego, California. There was a minor controversy over her decision to perform on the Academy Awards a week after the crash. But she appeared on the show to dedicate the nominated song, I'm Checking Out from the film Postcards from the Edge, to her fallen band members. During the performance, McEntire was visibly emotional. For this telecast host Billy Crystal won two Emmys, for writing and for his hosting performance.


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 62nd ANNUAL 3/26/90 w/original commercials… The 62nd Academy Awards were presented March 26, 1990 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. The venue, half the size of the one used the previous year, prompted Gil Cates (the producer of the telecast) and Karl Malden (the president of the Academy) to put a memo to "our friends in the industry" in the March 13th edition of the Daily Variety saying "Please understand: the tickets are gone" and pointing out that "next year we'll be back in comparatively spacious quarters, and then we'll try to find room for every Academy member who wants to attend, and maybe even some of the aunts, archbishops, and visitors from Abu Dhabi who are your houseguests that weekend." The event, billed as Around the World in 3½ Hours - The 62nd Academy Awards Presentation, featured live segments from five other cities around the globe: Buenos Aires, Argentina; London, United Kingdom; Moscow, Soviet Union (featuring Jack Lemmon and Natalya Negoda announcing the Oscar nominees for best foreign film); Sydney, Australia; and Tokyo, Japan. This was the first telecast hosted by Billy Crystal; he would host the show eight more times over the next twenty-two years. Crystal opened the ceremony with a song about the nominees for best picture, something he would do for every ceremony he hosted.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 61st ANNUAL 3/29/89 w/original commercials… The 61st Academy Awards were presented on Wednesday, March 29, 1989 at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. The date had been moved from its usual Monday telecast due to Easter, which was on March 26. For this show, there was no "official" host as the show opened with a stage-show featuring Merv Griffin, Snow White and Rob Lowe. Another change was that the producers attempted to change the traditional line "And the winner is..." to "And the Oscar goes to...". This broadcast is also noted for being the final public appearance of actress Lucille Ball, who died less than one month later.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 60th ANNUAL 4/11/88… The 60th Academy Awards were presented April 11, 1988 at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California. The ceremony was the first to be held there since the 20th Academy Awards. The 1988 Writers Guild of America strike, which began on March 7, were mentioned several times during the evening: host Chevy Chase claimed his "entire monologue was generously donated by five Teamsters" and Sean Connery referred to the strike in his acceptance speech. Billy Wilder was rewarded The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. The event was otherwise dominated by two films. The Last Emperor won all nine Oscars for which it was nominated, including two for Bernardo Bertolucci, who won for his direction and for co-writing the screenplay, adapted from the title character's autobiography. It did so in spite of having been "snubbed by several Hollywood studios and mishandled by the company (Columbia Pictures) that finally distributed it." Moonstruck, nominated for six Academy Awards, received three, two in acting categories (for Cher and Olympia Dukakis), and another for its original screenplay. Four films with five or more nominations were shut out: Broadcast News, Hope and Glory, Fatal Attraction, and Empire of the Sun. Janet Maslin, reviewing the ceremony for The New York Times, said the ceremony "emphasiz[ed] the low-gloss aspects of today's Hollywood"—a lack of gloss made particularly evident by the appearance of presenters Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn, who stood out like "visiting royalty".

 


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 59th ANNUAL 3/30/87… The 59th Academy Awards were presented March 30, 1987 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Chevy Chase, Goldie Hawn, and Paul Hogan. This ceremony was notable for being the last in 23 years to have multiple hosts, until the 82nd Academy Awards were hosted by Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin. Hannah and Her Sisters won both Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress, the last film to win both supporting acting categories until 2011, when The Fighter achieved this. The film also won Best Writing - Original Screenplay. An interesting thing to note is that Best Actress winner Marlee Matlin became the first (and only as of 2012) deaf Oscar winner.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 58th ANNUAL 3/24/86… The 58th Academy Awards, honoring the best film for 1985, were held on March 24, 1986 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. They were hosted by Alan Alda, Jane Fonda and Robin Williams. The ceremony was watched by 38.93 million viewers, tying the 78th Academy Awards as the third-lowest rated telecast since 1966. The 80th Academy Awards still holds the distinction of the least watched ceremony of 31.76 million.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 57th ANNUAL 3/25/85… The 57th Academy Awards were presented March 25, 1985 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Jack Lemmon. This ceremony is best-remembered for perhaps the most quoted and famous Academy Award acceptance speech ever. Upon winning the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in Places In The Heart, Sally Field exclaimed, "The first time I didn't feel it, but this time I feel it, and I can't deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!" (often misquoted as "you really like me!") The winner of Best Supporting Actor was also significant. Haing S. Ngor, a Cambodian surgeon who survived the horrors of the Khmer Rouge, won the award for his performance as Dith Pran in Roland Joffe's The Killing Fields, despite having no previous acting experience. Ngor and Harold Russell are the only two non-professional actors to win Academy Awards for acting. 77 year-old Peggy Ashcroft won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in A Passage to India, making her the oldest winner in that category.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 56th ANNUAL 4/9/84 w/original commercials… The 56th Academy Awards were presented April 9, 1984 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Johnny Carson. The Best Supporting Actress winner this year was unique. 4' 9" Linda Hunt won the award for her role as Billy Kwan - a male Chinese-Australian photographer - in Peter Weir's The Year of Living Dangerously, making her the first actor to win an Oscar for playing a character of the opposite sex.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 55th ANNUAL 4/11/83… The 55th Academy Awards were presented April 11, 1983 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Liza Minnelli, Dudley Moore, Richard Pryor and Walter Matthau. The 55th Academy Awards was almost dominated by Gandhi which was nominated for 11 categories out of which winning 8. Louis Gossett, Jr. became the first African-American actor to win Best Supporting Actor for his performance as the tough and principled drill sergeant Emil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman. Meryl Streep won her first Best Actress award. She had been nominated the year before for The French Lieutenant's Woman and would be nominated another thirteen times in the next thirty years. Streep had previously won the Best Supporting Actress award in 1979 for Kramer vs Kramer.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 54th ANNUAL 3/29/82 w/original commercials… The 54th Academy Awards were presented March 29, 1982 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Johnny Carson. Chariots of Fire was the surprise winner (with a leading 12 nominations Reds had been expected to win) of the Best Picture Oscar. It was the first time in 13 years that a British film won the Academy's top honor. Next year's winner, Gandhi, was also a British production. Henry Fonda won his only competitive Oscar this year, as Best Actor for On Golden Pond. At 76 years of age, Fonda became the oldest winner in the Best Actor category in Academy history. The only other nomination he received in his career was Best Actor for his performance in The Grapes Of Wrath 41 years ago - a record gap between acting nominations. His co-star, Katharine Hepburn, won her fourth Best Actress award that year, beating her own record for most amount of Best Actress wins by any actress. This year's nominations also marked for the very first time that three different films were nominated for the "Top Five" Academy Awards: Best Picture, Director, Actor, Actress and Screenplay. The three films were On Golden Pond, Atlantic City and Reds. However, none of them won the Best Picture prize, losing to Chariots of Fire. This also marked the first year that the award for Best Makeup was presented; the winner was Rick Baker for his work on An American Werewolf In London.


ACADEMY AWARDS 2 DVD 1981 195 minutes, excellent quality, a little grainy... hosted by Johnny Carson & it was postponed due to Reagan assassination attempt the day before

ACADEMY AWARDS 2 DVD AWARDS SHOW 1980 240 minutes, very good, a little grainy & mono sound

ACADEMY AWARDS 2 DVD 51st ANNUAL AWARDS SHOW DOROTHY CHANDLER PAVILION LOS ANGELES CA 4/9/79, reddish and a little grainy but watchable. Hosted by Johnny Carson. Notably, the two "front-runners" for Best Picture - "Coming Home" and "The Deer Hunter" - were anti-war films that reflected the nation's growing resentment over the Vietnam War. John Wayne, who would die of stomach cancer two months later, made his final public appearance to present the Oscar to the producers of "The Deer Hunter". This was also the final public appearance of Jack Haley, who died one month after presenting the Best Costume Design award with his co-star from "The Wizard of Oz", Ray Bolger. This was the first of several consecutive ceremonies presided over by host Carson; introducing him on this broadcast, the announcer identified him as "John Carson". As of 2011 this is the earliest Oscars where all 4 acting winners are still alive.


ACADEMY AWARDS 2 DVD 50th ANNIVERSARY SHOW DOROTHY CHANDLER PAVILION LOS ANGELES CA 4/3/78, vg with slight grain. Hosted by Bob Hope for the eighteenth and last time. Two of the year's biggest winners were "Star Wars", which swept the technical categories with wins in 7 out of 10 of it's nominations, and "Annie Hall", winning 4 out of 5 of it's nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actress and Best Director. This show is also notable for a very politically-charged acceptance speech by Vanessa Redgrave. "The Turning Point" set the record for most nominations without a win, with 11 nominations; this record was previously held by "Peyton Place" and "The Little Foxes" which both had 9. "Turning Point" and "The Color Purple" are tied for this record to this day.

ACADEMY AWARDS 2 DVD 49th ANNUAL 3/28/77… The 49th Academy Awards were presented March 28, 1977, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Richard Pryor, Jane Fonda, Ellen Burstyn and Warren Beatty. This Academy Awards ceremony is notable for Peter Finch becoming the first posthumous winner of an Oscar for acting, a feat matched only by Heath Ledger 32 years later. Beatrice Straight set another record by becoming the actor with shortest performance ever in a film to win an acting Oscar, with only five minutes and forty seconds of screentime in Network.


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1966 38th ACADEMY AWARDS, COLOR - excellent picture - 90 minutes - ABC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS - The 38th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1965, were held on April 18, 1966, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope. - The ceremony was broadcast on the ABC network and was the first to be broadcast live in color. - The two most nominated films were The Sound of Music and Doctor Zhivago, each with ten nominations and five wins. The winner of Best Picture was 20th Century Fox's and Robert Wise's The Sound of Music, adapted from the Rodgers and Hammerstein's Broadway musical. Both movies are in the top 10 inflation-adjusted commercially successful films ever made,[1] and both would appear 33 years later on the American Film Institute list of the greatest American films of the 20th Century. - The Sound of Music was the first Best Picture winner without a writing nomination since Hamlet; it would be the last until Titanic at the 70th Academy Awards. - Lynda Bird Johnson, daughter of President Johnson, attended the Academy Awards presentation and was escorted by actor George Hamilton - Date April 18, 1966 - Site Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California, Host - Bob Hope, Producer Joe Pasternak, Director Richard Dunlap, Highlights - Best Picture - The Sound of Music - Most awards Doctor Zhivago and The Sound of Music (5) - Most nominations Doctor Zhivago and The Sound of Music (10) - TV in

 


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 36th ANNUAL ABC-TV 4/13/1964 - Hosted by Jack Lemmon. Best Picture Nominees: Tom Jones, Cleopatra, Lilies Of The Field, How The West Was Won, and America, America. In black and white. 2 hours, with original commercials.

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1963 35th ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - ONLY 25 minutes, ABC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS - he 35th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1962, were held on April 8, 1963 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California, hosted by Frank Sinatra. - ate April 8, 1963 - Site Santa Monica Civic Auditorium - Host Frank Sinatra - Producer Arthur Freed - Director Richard Dunlap - Highlights - Best Picture Lawrence of Arabia - Most awards -Lawrence of Arabia (7) - Most nominations Lawrence of Arabia (10), TV in the United States - Network ABC


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1962 34th ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - 84 minutes, ABC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS The 34th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1961, were held on April 9, 1962 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope; this was the seventh time Hope hosted the Oscars. - Legendary filmmaker Federico Fellini received his first Best Director nomination for his film La Dolce Vita, though the movie itself failed to garner a nomination for Best Picture. - Sophia Loren became the first actor or actress to win for an acting Oscar for a non-English-speaking role. -- Date April 9, 1962 - Site Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California - Host Bob Hope - Producer Arthur Freed- Director Richard Dunlap - Highlights - Best Picture West Side Story, Most awards West Side Story (10) - Most nominations Judgment at Nuremberg and West Side Story (11) - TV in the United States -Network ABC

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1961 33RD ACADEMY AWARDS The 34th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1961, were held on April 9, 1962 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope; this was the seventh time Hope hosted the Oscars., Legendary filmmaker Federico Fellini received his first Best Director nomination for his film La Dolce Vita, though the movie itself failed to garner a nomination for Best Picture. Sophia Loren became the first actor or actress to win for an acting Oscar for a non-English-speaking role.


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1960 32ND ACADEMY AWARDS


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1959 31ST ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - INTRO SAYS 120 MIN BROADCAST ---BUT THIS DISC IS 51 minutes - NBC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS - The 31st Academy Awards ceremony was held on April 6, 1959, to honor the best films of 1958. The show's producer, Jerry Wald, started cutting numbers from the show to make sure it ran on time. He cut too much material and the ceremony ended 20 minutes early, leaving Jerry Lewis to attempt to fill in the time. Eventually, NBC cut to a re-run of a sports show., The film Gigi won nine Oscars, breaking the previous record of eight (set by Gone with the Wind and tied by From Here to Eternity and On the Waterfront). It would be short-lived, however, as Ben-Hur broke the record with eleven Oscars the following year. - Gigi was the last film until The Last Emperor to win Best Picture without any acting nominations. It also had the biggest clean sweep that would be met by The Last Emperor, winning all 9 of its nominations. The record was broken in 2003 by The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King with all 11 of its nominations, also another record of most Oscar wins with Ben-Hur and Titanic. - The ceremony was hosted by an ensemble of actors: Jerry Lewis, Mort Sahl, Tony Randall, Bob Hope, David Niven, and Laurence Olivier. Niven won Best Actor that night, making him the only host in Oscar history to have won an award during the same ceremony. - Date April 6, 1959 - Site Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California, USA, Host Jerry Lewis, Mort Sahl, Tony Randall, Bob Hope, David Niven, Laurence Olivier, Producer Jerry Wald - Director Alan Handley - Highlights - Best Picture Gigi - Most awards Gigi (9) - Most nominations The Defiant Ones and Gigi (9), TV in the United States - Network NBC


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1958 30TH ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - 41 minutes, 1ST LIVE BROADCAST - NBC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS - 1957's best films were honored at the 30th Academy Awards, held on 26 March 1958. - The Oscar for Writing Based on Material From Another Medium was awarded to Pierre Boulle for The Bridge on the River Kwai, despite the fact that he did not know English. The actual writers, Carl Foreman and Michael Wilson were blacklisted at the time and did not receive screen credit for their work. Foreman and Wilson have since been acknowledged by the Academy for their contributions. - Joanne Woodward's win for Best Actress for her triple role as Eve White, Eve Black and Jane in The Three Faces of Eve marked the film as the last film to win Best Actress without being nominated for other awards. This was broken 31 years later when Jodie Foster won Best Actress for her role in The Accused, the film's only nomination. - Peyton Place tied the record for the most nominations without a single win (9) with The Little Foxes. It would not be broken until 1977 when The Turning Point received 11 nominations without a win, which has not been broken since, though The Color Purple subsequently tied the record. Peyton Place also set the record for most unsuccessful acting nominations with five; this record has been tied once, by Tom Jones at the 36th Academy Awards. - It was the first time the ceremonies were broadcast live.This was the first time all five Best Picture nominations were nominated for Best Director as well.

 

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1957 29TH ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - 50 minutes, NBC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS - During the 29th Academy Awards, the regular competitive category of Best Foreign Language Film was introduced, instead of only being recognized as a Special Achievement Award or as a Best Picture nominee (as in 1938). The first winner in this new category was Federico Fellini's La strada with Anthony Quinn and a second nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Its win would help spur an interest in foreign-language films. Another Fellini film, Nights of Cabiria would win the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar in the following year., This was also the first year that all of the five Best Picture nominees were in color. It was also the first Oscar telecast to be videotaped for later broadcast, especially for those network affiliates that didn't want to broadcast the event live. All of the major awards winners were large-scale epics - Mike Todd's Around the World in 80 Days, The King and I, Anastasia, Giant, Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments (the highest grossing film of the year), King Vidor's War and Peace, and William Wyler's Friendly Persuasion. And the trend toward blockbusters and colorful spectaculars was established for years to come, with The Bridge on the River Kwai, Gigi, and Ben-Hur being subsequent Best Picture champions. The Best Original Story category had two interesting quirks this year. First, the Oscar for Best Original Story went to Robert Rich (also known as Dalton Trumbo) for The Brave One. Trumbo was blacklisted at the time so he could not get screen credit under his own name. Second, Edward Bernds and Elwood Ullman withdrew their names from consideration in this category for their work on High Society. The nomination was apparently intended for the musical starring Grace Kelly, but Bernds and Ullman had instead worked on a Bowery Boys movie of the same title. Indeed, this nomination was a double mistake. High Society was based on the play and movie The Philadelphia Story and probably would not have qualified as an original story anyway., It was here that James Dean became the only actor to receive a second posthumous – and consecutive – nomination for acting., Director John Ford's classic western The Searchers, widely seen as one of the best American films of all time, failed to receive a single nomination., This was the second time since the introduction of the Supporting Actor and Actress awards that Best Picture, Best Director, and all four acting Oscars were given to different films. This would not happen again until the 78th Academy Awards. Around the World in 80 Days became the sixth film to win Best Picture without any acting nominations. - Date 27 March 1957, Site RKO Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California, NBC Century Theatre
New York City, New York, Host Jerry Lewis, Celeste Holm - Producer - Valentine Davies, Director Bill Bennington, Max Miller, Highlights - Best Picture - Around the World in 80 Days - Most awards - Around the World in 80 Days and The King and I (5) - Most nominations Giant (10) - TV in the United States - Network NBC


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1956 28TH ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - 65 minutes, NBC BROADCAST -- BASIC FACTS - The 28th Academy Awards were presented at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles, California. Marty, a simple and low-budget film usually uncharacteristic of Best Picture awardees, became the shortest film (as well as the second Palme d'Or winner) to win the top honor. - Date March 21, 1956, Site RKO Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California, NBC Century Theatre, New York City, New York, Host Jerry Lewis (Los Angeles), Claudette Colbert (New York), Joseph L. Mankiewicz (New York), Producer Robert Emmett Dolan, Director George Seaton, Highlights , Best Picture Marty, Most awards Marty (4), Most nominations Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing, Marty and The Rose Tattoo , TV in the United States, Network NBC


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD AWARDS SHOW 3/30/55, blk & white, 90 minutes, vg picture


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1954 26TH ACADEMY AWARDS sharp crisp blk and white - 59 minutes, NBC BROADCAST (1952 WAS 1ST TV BROADCAST) -- BASIC FACTS he 26th Academy Awards honored the best in films of 1953. The second national telecast of the Awards show drew an estimated 43 million viewers. Shirley Booth, appearing in a play in Philadelphia, presented the Best Actor award through a live broadcast cut-in, and privately received the winner's name over the telephone from co-host Donald O'Connor. (Actor Fredric March co-hosted from New York City.) Gary Cooper filmed his presentation of the Best Actress award in advance on a set in Mexico, with O'Connor announcing the winner's name. All the major winners in this year were black-and-white films. The big winner was Fred Zinnemann's From Here to Eternity, with thirteen nominations and eight awards including Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Director, Best Screenplay (Daniel Taradash), Best Cinematography (Burnett Guffey), Best Sound, and Best Film Editing. All five of its major actors and actresses were nominated, with secondary players Donna Reed and Frank Sinatra taking home Oscars. The candid film was based on James Jones' controversial, best-selling novel about Army life on a Hawaiian (Oahu) military base just prior to the Pearl Harbor attack and World War II, illustrating the conflict between an individualistic private (Montgomery Clift) and rigid institutional authority (exemplified by the Army). Its achievement of eight awards matched the then record held by Gone with the Wind (1939). The record would be tied again the following year by On the Waterfront (1954). Walt Disney won four awards, which remains the record for the most Oscars won in the same year. William Holden's speech for Best Actor for his role in Stalag 17 was simply "Thank You", making it one of the shortest speeches ever; the TV broadcast had a strict cutoff time which forced Holden's quick remarks. The frustrated Holden personally paid for advertisements in the Hollywood trade publications to thank everyone he wanted to on Oscar night. He also remarked that he felt that either Burt Lancaster or Montgomery Clift should have won the Best Actor Oscar for From Here to Eternity, instead of him. Date March 25, 1954, Site RKO Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California - NBC Century Theatre
New York City, New York - Host donald O'Connor (Los Angeles) - Fredric March (New York City) - Highlights - Best Picture from Here to Eternity Most awards From Here to Eternity (8) - Most nominations From Here to Eternity (13)
TV in the United States Network NBC


ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 25th ANNUAL 3/19/53… The 25th Academy Awards ceremony was held on March 19, 1953. It took place at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, California and the NBC International Theatre in New York City. It was the first Academy Awards ceremony to be televised and the first ceremony to be held in Hollywood and New York City simultaneously. It was also the only year that the New York ceremonies were to be held in the International Theatre on Columbus Circle, which was shortly thereafter demolished and replaced by the New York Coliseum convention center.

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1951 23RD ACADEMY AWARDS -- COLOR - excellent picture , 71 minutes, even has red carpet arrivals footage, BASIC FACTS The 23rd Academy Awards Ceremony awarded Oscars for the best in films in 1950. The nominations were notable this year, as All About Eve was nominated for fourteen Oscars, beating the previous record of thirteen set by Gone with the Wind. Sunset Boulevard became the second film with nominations in every acting category not to win a single one (after My Man Godfrey in 1936). This would not happen again until American Hustle was shut out at the 86th Academy Awards. - Date march 29, 1951, Site RKO Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California, Host Fred Astaire, Highlights, Best Picture All About Eve - Most awards All About Eve (6), Most nominations All About Eve (14)

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1950 22ND ACADEMY AWARDS -- sharp crisp blk and white - 78 minutes, seems to be like a feature for movie theater BASIC FACTS the 22nd Academy Awards Ceremony awarded Oscars for the best in films in 1949. This was the last year for which all five Best Picture nominees were in black and white. March 23, 1950 - Site RKO Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California, Host paul Douglas - Highlights - Best Picture All the King's Men
Most awards The Heiress (4) - Most nominations The Heiress (8)

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1949 21st ACADEMY AWARDS -- sharp crisp blk and white - 56 minutes, seems to be like a feature for movie theater -- BASIC FACTS features numerous firsts. It was the first time a non-Hollywood production won Best Picture, Hamlet. It was the first time an individual (Laurence Olivier) directed himself in an Oscar-winning performance. Director John Huston directs two Oscar-winning performances in the same year for two different films: his father Walter Huston in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and Claire Trevor for Key Largo. The Huston family won three Oscars that evening. The ceremony was moved from the Shrine Auditorium to the Academy's own theater primarily because the major Hollywood studios had withdrawn their financial support in order to address rumors that they had been trying to influence voters.Jane Wyman became the first performer since the silent era to win an Oscar for a performance with no lines. Humphrey Bogart failed to receive a nomination for Best Actor in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, which is now considered one of the Academy’s greatest slights.This year introduced the award for Best Costumes presented by Elizabeth Taylor. Joan of Arc became the first film to receive 7 nominations without being nominated for Best Picture. Hamlet became the fifth film to win Best Picture without a screenwriting nomination; the next to do so would be The Sound of Music at the 38th Academy Awards. -----------Date March 24, 1949 , Site The Academy Theater, Hollywood, California, USA, Host Robert Montgomery, Highlights
Best Picture Hamlet Most awards Hamlet (4), Most nominations Johnny Belinda (12)

ACADEMY AWARDS 1 DVD 1948 (presented in 1949): Robert Montgomery, George Murphy, Ava Gardner, Louis Jourdan, Deborah Kerr, Glenn Ford, Ann Blyth, Jeanne Crain, Wendell Corey, Arlene Dahl, Susan Hayward, Elizabeth Taylor, Robert Ryan, Kathryn Grayson, Celeste Holm, Walter Huston, Edmund Gwenn, Claire Trevor, Jean Hersholt, Fred Zinneman, Sid Grauman, Walter Wanger, Jerry Wald, Frank Borzage, John Huston, Loretta Young, Ronald Coleman, Jane Wyman, Ethel Barrymore, Douglas Fairbanks Jr.